De Facto Relationship

A De Facto relationship arises when two people, who are in a relationship, are not married or related by family, and having regard to all the circumstances of the relationship, are a couple who live together on genuine domestic basis. Circumstances of the relationship that the Court will consider in determining whether a De Facto relationship exists or not include the duration of the relationship, living arrangements, whether there was a sexual relationship, financial arrangements, property owned jointly or individually, any registration of the relationship under State or Territory law, any children and public representation of the relationship.

Grounds for Property Claims in a De Facto Relationship

If a De Facto relationship breaks down, the Family Law Act provides that a Court can make orders in relation to property of the relationship only if: -

  • The relationship has lasted for a minimum of 2 years; or

  • If there is a child of the relationship; or

  • A party has made a substantial contribution; or

  • The relationship was registered under a State/Territory law.

As a result, the De Facto relationship that last for less than 2 years, a property claim can only be made if there is a child of the relationship, the relationship is registered or if the concerned party has made a substantial contribution.

Substantial Contribution

Substantial contributions are contributions which are not ‘illusory’ and are ‘considerable or large’ having real worth or value. Contributions that would be considered by the Court as being substantial contributions include, but are not limited to, the following: -

  • Financial contributions made for acquisition, conservation or improvement of any property of parties

  •  Non-financial contributions made for the acquisition, conservation or improvement of any property of parties

  • Contributions made to the welfare of the relationship and/or children of the relationship including homemaker contributions.

When determining whether a contribution is a substantial contribution, the Court may also take into account other considerations, such as: -

  • Effect of any proposed order on earning capacity of any party

  • Matters such as age, health, income, care or control of child, any commitments, standard of living, extent of contributions to financial resources of the relationship

  • Any financial agreement/arrangement between the parties

  • Child support

There is a further requirement for claims based on substantial contributions. If a party makes a substantial contribution and in the absence of an order that party would suffer a serious injustice, only then can a claim for property be made by that party. The Court requires this injustice to be more than slight and a mere injustice will not suffice.

If you have been in a de facto relationship that has unfortunately broken down and you would like to discuss further what your entitlements are, please do not hesitate to contact one of our approachable family lawyers. The number to dial is 03 9614 7111, or email us out of hours on melbourne@nevettford.com.au.