Myth 1: “I don’t see the kids, so I don’t have to pay child support.” Or “If you don’t pay child support, you won’t be able to see the kids.”

The Family Law Act 1975 recognizes that it is in the best interests of a child to have a meaningful relationship with both parents, and to be assured that he/she is supported financially, whether they are biological or adoptive parents, same sex or otherwise. Preventing your child from spending time with the other parent simply because he/she refuses to pay child support would be viewed by the Court as pushing your child/not acting in your child’s best interest.

Myth 2:Child support must always be assessed by the Child Support Agency of the Department of Human Service.”

If the parents are hostile and cannot reach an agreement as child support, Child Support Agency can assess how much child support should be paid. The assessment is formula based and takes into account several factors, including:

  1. Taxable income of each of the parents;
  2. Costs of raising the child or children;
  3. Percentage of time the child or children spend with each parent (usually only nights are taken into consideration);
  4. The age of the child or children;
  5. The cost of living of each of the parents;
  6. Whether there are any other dependant children.

Whilst either parent may request the Child Support Agency to make an assessment of the amount of child support one parent must pay to the other, parents can come to their own agreement about how much child support should be paid. Parents may negotiate a private agreement about child support. They may agree on a sum less than or greater than the amount assessed by the Child Support Agency. The parents may agree on the method of paying significant expenditures such as private school fees, uniforms, sporting fees, etc. They may also agree on a lump sum arrangement. In these circumstances, it is usually advisable for parties to enter into a Child Support Agreement.

There are two different types of Child Support Agreements: Binding Child Support Agreement and Limited Child Support Agreement.

Myth 3: My ex-partner and I can sign a piece of paper stipulating the amount of child support to be paid without getting lawyers involved.”

If parents decide to enter into a Limited Child Support Agreement the parties are not required to get legal advice before entering into a limited agreement however a child support assessment must already be in place and the annual rate payable under the agreement must be equal to or more than the annual rate of child support payable under the child support assessment.

Binding Child Support Agreements on the other hand can be made for any amount that the parents agree to. However, Child Support Agency will not accept a Binding Child Support Agreement without each parent first obtaining independent legal advice. They require legal practitioners to complete a Certificate to verify that parents received legal advice before entering into a binding agreement for Child Support.

You should contact one of our experienced Family Lawyers on 03 9615 7111 or email us out of hours on melbourne@nevettford.com.au for further advice with respect to the issues of child support or about which one of these Agreements is more suitable to your needs.